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Returning to Gilman for a tour on July 26, 1997. The entrance to the Garnett family's basement,
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Standing above the cavern in the Gilman mine where the ball and rod mills are housed. The mills are on an incline for gravity feed down to the loading docks. At the center right of the photo, steel rods are stacked for use in the rod mill.
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Using a level to make sure the mine tailings flume is canted to the right angle. Tailings were piped from Gilman as a slurry and, as the slurry dried, it became the same consistency as a fine sand.
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Maloit Park showing the playground area in the back left. The park is east of Minturn on Highway 24 approximately two miles. The New Jersey Zinc Co. recreation grounds were renamed Maloit Park in November of 1958. The park was dedicated on July 4th, 1959, becoming a public facility. Frank Maloit retired in the spring of 1959 after being affiliated with the Company at Gilman since 1922.
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Wood framing used to support walls and overhead in the mine at Gilman, known as ”Mitchell Sets."
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Sign at the entrance of Gilman, Colorado, for the Eagle Mine, Empire Zinc Division, New Jersey Zinc Co. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Darrell Barnes supervising the play at Maloit park. Darrell was the chief accountant at Gilman for many years.
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Verso: "D-158. Mining Town in the Rockies. Perched on the side of Battle Mountain above the deep and narrow Eagle River Canyon, the modern mining community of Gilman is a picturesque sight along U.S. 24 between Leadville and Minturn, Colorado."
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Returning to Gilman for a tour on July 26, 1997. The coal shed (on right) at the Garnett family's residence; the steps lead to the yard where Shirley Wenziker is standing.,
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Returning to Gilman for a tour on July 26, 1997. Photo of the May's residence. Shirley Winziker Washburne is standing on the boardwalk in front of the house. Behind the house, there is a coal shed and steps leading up to a street.
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The New Jersey Zinc Company office in Gilman, Colorado. The cinder block portion, which was the newer portion of the office, was constructed in approximately 1953. [license plate 1953]
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Dick Sayers (left) and John Skinner, examining ore in the ore cars. Both men are wearing headlamps.
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Using a lift to move drums of chemicals in the Gilman mine.
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At 16 level, the ore train would dump rock into the large pit (Grizzly) at the bottom of which was located a jaw crusher. The crusher would send the ore into the ball mill and rod mill where the ore was pulverized to a fine powder. Inside the ball mill, there would be ore and steel balls, approximately 10 in. in diameter. As the mill rotated, the ore was crushed by the balls. Eventually, the balls would wear down and Bob Riggle remembers his dad...
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Machinery seen through railings.
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Air operated mucking machine. The scoop goes over the mucking machine and empties the ore into the car behind. Miners also used these cars to move mining timbers throughout the mine. The machines and cars ran on rail tracks.
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Floation area for the zinc ore at Gilman. Flotation tables were used to seperate the zinc and lead from the waste in the mining process. Further processing separated the lead and the zinc.
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Dick Sayers (left) and John Skinner discussing the adjustments to equipment. A good view of the headlamp attachment to the battery pack carried on one's belt.
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Ore cars full of ore lined up on the rails, waiting to go to the crushers.
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Returning to Gilman for a tour on July 26, 1997. Photo of the William Jude residence, occupied by the Jude family during the late 1930s to the early 1940s.